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20121104
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beloved cousin and in law. prayers as you move through this season of sorrow. and of grief. thank you for sharing george breathes with you. profoundly george stanley mcgovern as a son an example of our heritage, i each of you for coming celebrate and honor senator mcgovern's life and witness. to share the mcgovern family's brief. to political colleague, a trusted mentor -- [no audio] and prairie form them to embrace common person and to tirelessly worked for the common good. george mcgovern was also a prairie prophet. he called and inspired an generation to do justice, to love mercy and to walk with our god. he focused the world's on the plight of the hungry. fought for peace. he called on us to repent a misguided, wasteful, and selfish to seeking and speaking the truth. articulate it in his hometown to and not in nazareth to preach the good news to the poor, to be prisoners, to give sight to the blind and to proclaim the year of the lord's savior. we can learn much from jesus' experience in bringing good to the poor and liberating the oppressed. of teaching and preaching in galilee.
? they passed a law to change the system. we say, here are the people who qualify and the yget the loans at a lower interest rate. every student in the country who gets one of these loans will have the right to pay it back as a low, fixed percent of their income for 20 years. now, think about this. what that means is, nobody ever has to drop out of college because theyr'e scared of b orrowing more money. if you get out and want to teach in a small town in rural ohio -- you can do it anyway. what you have to pay will be determined by what you're making. not the other way around. and believe it or not, here's the kicker. this, over 10 years, costs you $60 billion less than the old system. so -- the president and the congress allocated that to increasing pell grands every year for a decade and to maintaining the tuition tax credit to pay the way through college. this is unbelievable. now, here's what you need to know. even the more moderate immage of governor romney cannot obscure the fact he has committed to repealing that law. he wants to give -- i'm telling you. idiology over evidence. t
th in the world. what do the president and congress do? they passed laws to change the system. the government sets aside a loan reserve saying these are the ones eagle for loans. starting next year, everyone in the country gets one of these loans will have the absolute right to pay back as a low fixed percent of their income. think about this. [applause] what that means is nobody ever has to worry whether they cannot pay their loans. if he get out of college and you want to go teach in a small town in ohio or the salaries are low, you can do it anyway for a few years because what you have to pay will be determined by what you are making, not the other way around. [cheers and applause] believe it or not, over 10 years this cost you $6 billion less than the old system. -- $60 billion less than the old system. the president and congress allocated at $60 million to increasing the pell grants every year for a decade to keep up with inflation and maintaining the tuition tax credits for middle-class families to help pay their kids way through college. this is unbelievable. here is wh
. degrees from dartmouth, h.b.s. and harvard law school starting with a philadelphia investment counseling firm. they were later bought by united asset management which ed eventually ran. from there he became chairman of delaware investments a large mutual furnished investment company. next he was called in to run put man investments in boston which had experienced regulatory failing. he righted that ship and sold it at a good price for shareholders to a large canadian financial firm. it was at that time we approached ed to run freddie mac. freddie mac and fannie mae with the broader issues of u.s. government housing and finance is one of the major unfinished pieces of business in financial regulatory reform. it is clearly an important issue. we have c-span here tonight filming this. ed has a prbgts of an saerpbs -- perspective of an experienced manager and thoughtful public policy participant. this evening he will talk about where the g.s.e.'s have been and what to do with them. my great pleasure to ed haldeman. >> thanks for that kind introduction, bob. i'm appreciative of so much of you
not been brought up on the voter i.d. law. my view of it is you need an i.d. for everything. opening a bank account, cashing checks. i think the voter i.d. deal covers a lot of programs where a lot of fraud and abuse comes in there. i was curious as to why it hasn't been addressed. there is a lot of defense that i think the republican campaign might have done it to squash any allegations of voter suppression. guest: i think he is absolutely right. we know from base polling in ohio that well over 75% of voters support voter identification law in ohio. however we do have identification requirements in ohio. you have to show either a driver's license, put down the last four digits of your social security number, or you have to show a utility bill showing your address. we do have identification requirements in ohio. we do not have voter identification requirements but i think overall the legislature has felt it has not been necessary in ohio. we do have pre-registration in ohio. you have to be a resident for 30 days in ohio in which to register to vote. we think that is fair. we have other requ
would have had a restructuring within the bankruptcy law, so the automobile industry would have looked exactly the way it does today. i think it would even have been in better shape and created more jobs. that is an opinion, and nobody is going to be able to dispute or advocate, because we will never know. the effect of the matter is, he government has over a $50 billion investment in general motors in stock today. for the government to ever recover that money, i think the stock price is good to have to go up between $55.60 dollars. that is probably not going to happen in my lifetime or your lifetime. host: we go to the republican line, for the republican party chairman in ohio. caller: i have some facts and figures for the american people. people seem to forget what has happened in our past. obama claims the democrats took control when you were a 22 of 2009. actually, the democrats took control january 3 of 2007. they took control of the congress and the senate. that was the first time since 1995. under bush, unemployment was 4.6% and gdp was 3.5%, and 50 straight months of job growth
as a journalist and served as a fellow in law and public policy here at the university. the rules for tonight's discussion are simple. we have asked candidates to join us for conversation about the role of government in our lives and the direction of our country. we have asked them to answer a question as directly and concisely as possible. we have asked them to stay on point. the candidates may talk to one another, but i will be managing the time we spend on a particular topic and we will have the freedom to move the conversation along. each candidate will have an opposing statement along with 90 seconds. there are no opening statements. we flipped a coin to see who got the first question. if we begin tonight with congresswoman tammy baldwin. good to have you. >> thank you. >> it's about your portrayal in the campaign. you have been portrayed in this campaign as an extreme liberal. that's what we see in the advertising and people have been bombarded by the apsa in the race. the national journal, a respected publication, said that you have either one of the most or the most liberal voting rec
required to show i.d.? guest: a law was passed to do that but it's held up in court so they will not be required to show photo i.d. in this election. host: how about as votes are tab bue lated what are the systems in place and what makes sure they are upheld? guest: optical scanners are the system in wisconsin. it's been proven to hold up and proven under recounts we've had. that has the virtue of being easy toster and preserving a paper record. so that is the system in wisconsin. we've had some very close elections and we've had continue verse sis and debates over the voting system and over the integrity of the elections. i'm sure those are going to continue and if it's a close election in 2012, anything like it was in 2004 and 2,000 when the margin for president was under half a percentage point, i'm sure those debates will continue. host: as far as people who turn out to vote, what st. the his 2ri? guest: thousand shall vote in wisconsin. that's been the history of the state. extraordinary levels of turn out really. we tend to lead the nation in turn out. our turn ou
in this health care law, we need to keep the good and get rid of the bad. if somebody from the republican side actually extended that hand and said let's fix this, let's get of the rest of the bad stuff and there would have been a whole lot a better dialogue and we would have been better had. this is far too poor to publicize, and i think for the last t done via zero election cycles there has been an unwillingness to sit down and solve the problem because they would rather use it as a political wedge issue to get elected, and that is almost too cynical, and is one of the reasons i am in this race because i'm tired of the cynicism, the partisanship, this is way too important. we need to everything we can. >> it needs to be repealed. here's something that's people in north dakota it did not want, and yet it was shocked to in the middle of the night, and rather than get input from people, my opponent went around the state with rows to campaign for it and push for it rather than get input. the runaway the process works is we need to have open committees come bring everybody together, and work out
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9

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